UK Dementia Research Institute at Imperial College London - Seminar Series

11 December 2018

 Epigenetic mechanisms in Alzheimer’s disease

Katie LunnonGuest lecture - 11 December
Dr Katie Lunnon 
Associate Professor in Epigenetics
University of Exeter Medical School

Biography

Katie is an Associate Professor in Epigenetics at the University of Exeter Medical School, with a particular interest in dementia. Her group published the first genome-wide, cross-tissue epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (Lunnon et al, Nat Neurosci-2014), which has been cited >200 times. This year her group published a follow up EWAS paper highlighting differential DNA methylation across an extended 48kb region in the HOXA3 gene in individuals with AD (Smith et al, Alzheimers Dement-2018). Katie currently leads a team of three postdoctoral researchers and five postgraduate students, who are utilising a range of cutting-edge methodologies to elucidate the role of epigenetic mechanisms in dementia. They are using sophisticated bioinformatics approaches to meta-analyse all available AD EWAS datasets and also perform integrative multi-omics analyses in well characterised cohorts to combine different levels of molecular information. They are also performing a range of wet lab molecular and cellular biology experiments, including epigenetic editing in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

Katie was recently awarded the Alzheimer’s Research UK Young Investigator of the Year award in 2017 and an Alzheimer’s Society Dementia Research Leaders award in 2015 for academic achievements.  Katie is module lead for the final year double (30) credit module "Frontiers in Neuroscience" on the BSc Medical Sciences program, co-ordinator of the Alzheimer’s Research UK South West Network Centre and sits on the ARUK grant review board.

Host

Professor Paul Matthews (p.matthews@imperial.ac.uk)
Contact Dr Jennifer Podesta (UKDRI@Imperial.ac.uk) to arrange to meet with the speaker

Date and time

Tuesday 11 December 2018
12:30 - 13:30
Light lunch available from 12:00 in the Wolfson Cafe

Venue

Seminar Room 10A
Wolfson Education Centre
Hammersmith Campus

Directions to the Hammersmith Campus and campus map are available on the College 'visit Hammersmith' web page

5 March 2019

Robin Franklin

Guest lecture - 5 March
Professor Robin Franklin FMedSci
Professor of Stem Cell Medicine at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute
The University of Cambridge

Host

Professor Paul Matthews (p.matthews@imperial.ac.uk)
Contact Dr Jennifer Podesta (UKDRI@Imperial.ac.uk) to arrange to meet with the speaker

Venue

E519 Burlington Danes Building
Hammersmith Campus

Directions to the Hammersmith Campus and campus map are available on the College 'visit Hammersmith' web page

9 April 2019

Is it possible to prevent Alzheimer with multidomain interventions? 

Miia Kivipelto

Guest lecture - 9 April
Professor Miia Kivipelto
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society
Karolinska Institutet 

Host
Professor Paul M Matthews (p.matthews@imperial.ac.uk)
Contact Dr Jennifer Podesta (UKDRI@imperial.ac.uk) to arrange to meet with the speaker

Venue
E519, Burlington Danes Building, Hammersmith Campus
Directions for finding Hammersmith Hospital are available on the College 'Visit Hammersmith' web page

Recent Seminars

Dr Lenore J Launer, Epidemiology to guide discovery

Using epidemiology to guide discovery: Repurposing drugs to prevent dementia - 19 June 2018

Lenore LaunerSpecial guest
Dr Lenore J. Launer
Senior Investigator, Chief, Neuroepidemiology Section
Intramural Research Program,
National Institute on Aging, NIH

Basing drug target identification on observational epidemiologic cohort studies has many unique advantages that complement other strategies for drug discovery. The case of hypertension as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease provides an example of using observational epidemiologic data to identify drugs that reduce AD risk. A brief overview will be given on blood pressure-brain epidemiologic and trial findings, as well as methodologic issues in studying these relationships. Preliminary data will be presented from a meta-analysis of population-based follow-up studies examining the risk for dementia-associated various anti-hypertensive medications.

Host
Dr Maksym Kopanitsa (m.kopanitsa@imperial.ac.uk)

Date and time
Tuesday 19 June 2018, 15:00 (with refreshments available from 14:30)

Venue
Praed Street seminar room, St Mary’s Faculty of Medicine Building
Directions for finding St Mary's Campus are available on the College 'Visit St Mary's' web page

Prof Seth Grant, Synaptome Mapping

Synaptome mapping: new technical approaches for unravelling the molecular architecture of synapses and the brain - 22 June 2018


Seth GrantSpecial guest
Professor Seth Grant, FRSE, FMedSci 
Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences
University of Edinburgh


Synapses are hallmarks of brain complexity – they are found in vast numbers and contain over 1,000 protein types. What is the purpose of this molecular complexity, how did it arise, and is there any logic to its organization?

We have addressed these issues using large-scale molecular approaches focused on the postsynaptic terminal of excitatory synapses. We found that postsynaptic proteins are hierarchically assembled into signalling complexes and supercomplexes, and these are distributed between synapses to generate synapse types. Whole-brain synapse maps revealed striking synaptic diversity and a “synaptome architecture” of the brain. Synaptome maps correlate with the structural and functional connectome, indicating that maps of synapse molecular diversity are features of systems-level organization.

We also analyzed the postsynaptic responses to elementary patterns of neural activity and a repertoire of innate and learned behaviours in mice with mutations in >50 postsynaptic proteins. The results of these experiments, together with the synaptome map data indicate that synapse diversity is a means of storing and recalling information in the brain. Synapse proteome complexity may generate a virtually limitless number of synapse types and synaptome maps offering immense information storage that can be accessed by patterns of activity. Autism and schizophrenia mutations disrupted the hierarchical assembly of supercomplexes and synaptome map architecture, the responses to sequences of activity and the behavioural repertoire.

Host
Dr Maksym Kopanitsa (m.kopanitsa@imperial.ac.uk)

Date and time
Friday 22 June 2018, 13:30 (with a light lunch available from 13:00)

Venue
E519, Burlington Danes Building, Hammersmith Hospital
Directions for finding Hammersmith Hospital are available on the College 'Visit Hammersmith' web page